Play of words (2)

LET us continue reading the pastoral letter of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines regarding the so-called “Pajero” bishops.

Our dear People of God

…Out of their sincere desire to help their people, they failed to consider the pitfalls to which these grants could possibly lead them. They have also expressed their readiness to do everything that is necessary to heal this wound so that we can all move forward in hope.

We also assure you, our beloved people, that we shall re-examine the manner of our collaboration with government agencies for purposes of helping the poor, making sure that pastoral sensibilities are respected and the highest ethical standards are observed.

We shall examine our values in the light of our vocation to be disciples of Jesus Christ. We commit ourselves to the long journey of personal and social transformation required of all disciples of the Lord. We plead with you to walk with us in this path of constant renewal.

We express again our deep sorrow for the pain that the recent events have brought to you, our beloved people.

The good Lord knows our love for you. The words of the Psalmist come to our mind: “My sacrifice, a contrite spirit. A humbled, contrite heart you will not spurn” (Ps.51).

As the same Psalmist addresses the Lord, we take his words as our own to encourage and challenge us: “Indeed you love truth in the heart; then in the secret of my heart teach me wisdom.”

For the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines,

Bishop of Tandag
President, Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines

July 11, 2011


I FIND this very interesting.

In his memoirs titled ‘Apuntes Sobre La Revolucion Filipina (Notes on the Philippine Revolution), Julio Nakpil wrote “I swear before God and before History that everything related in these notes is the truth and I entreat the historian not to publish this until after my death.”

On page 30 of his memoirs can be found Nakpil’s notes on the death of Bonifacio, and on page 130 is his account of the assassination of Antonio Luna where Nakpil wrote “When General A. Luna was dastardly assassinated on the stairs of the Convent of Kabanatuan and already fallen on the ground, the mother of Emilio Aguinaldo looked out the window and asked: ‘Ano, humihinga pa ba?'” On pages 157-158, Nakpil wrote of Aguinaldo.

The crimes he committed against Andres Bonifacio and Antonio Luna, and his attempt to assassinate the undersigned [Julio Nakpil] should be condemned by history, and Universal Freemasonry ought to expel him and declare him a spurious son.

The coward finds many dangers where none exist!”

Had he fought with his captors, regardless of whether he succumbed so that he might be considered a hero, at least to vindicate his crimes, by this time we would be admiring a monument to the second hero of the Philippines, unlike what he did delivering himself as prisoner and afterward taking an oath of allegiance to the American flag.

“Emilio Aguinaldo’s surrender to the American’s was a cowardly act. There was no doubt that he coveted the presidency. He surrendered for fear that others more competent than he would occupy the post of president of the Republic.


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